Which skills are going to be on the test?

By // April 5, 2017

The following is a repost of a piece by Seth Godin. “23 things artificially intelligent computers can do better/faster/cheaper than you can.”

This is worth reading and considering, and hopefully the point is clear. Is a standard school curriculum preparing students for the future? At LightHouse we believe that the most important skills for students to develop are:

  • learning how to learn
  • critical thinking
  • creative thinking
  • collaboration
  • vision, and by that we mean curiosity, interest, connection, self-esteem, and self-confidence.

What do you think 21st century learners are going to need to know?

Wisdom from Seth:

23 things artificially intelligent computers can do better/faster/cheaper than you can

Predict the weather
Read an X-ray
Play Go
Correct spelling
Figure out the P&L of a large company
Pick a face out of a crowd
Count calories
Fly a jet across the country
Maintain the temperature of your house
Book a flight
Give directions
Create an index for a book
Play Jeopardy
Weld a metal seam
Trade stocks
Place online ads
Figure out what book to read next
Water a plant
Monitor a premature newborn
Detect a fire
Play poker
Read documents in a lawsuit
Sort packages

If you’ve seen enough movies, you’ve probably bought into the homunculus model of AI–that it’s in the future and it represents a little mechanical man in a box, as mysterious in his motivations as we are.

The future of AI is probably a lot like the past: it nibbles. Artificial intelligence does a job we weren’t necessarily crazy about doing anyway, it does it quietly, and well, and then we take it for granted. No one complained when their thermostat took over the job of building a fire, opening the grate, opening a window, rebuilding a fire. And no one complained when the computer found 100 flights faster and better than we ever could.

But the system doesn’t get tired, it keeps nibbling. Not with benign or mal intent, but with a focus on a clearly defined task.

This can’t help but lead to unintended consequences, enormous when they happen to you, and mostly small in the universal scheme of things. Technology destroys the perfect and then it enables the impossible.

The question each of us has to ask is simple (but difficult): What can I become quite good at that’s really difficult for a computer to do one day soon? How can I become so resilient, so human and such a linchpin that shifts in technology won’t be able to catch up?

It was always important, but now it’s urgent.

(see the original post here: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2017/04/24-things-artificially-intelligent-computers-can-do-better-than-you-can.html)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *